4th Quarter is Good for Buyers!


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Supply up 11% since August, Down 12% from 2016

For Buyers:
The 4th quarter is a good time to be a buyer seasonally. After April or May, buyer activity gradually declines every month with the 4th quarter seeing the lowest level of contracts in escrow. This is typical within all price ranges. Meanwhile, supply levels tend to rally in October with new listings after becoming stale over summer months. This provides the remaining buyers with more listing s to choose from fewer competing for offers. A welcome relief for many, however, this seasonal lull doesn't mean buyers will win with low offers. For most buyers, this environment only provides fewer competing offers on their preferred properties. It doesn't necessarily mean they'll get a bargain.

Commentary written by Tamboer, Senior Real Estate Analyst with the Cromford Report. 
(copyright symbol)2017 Cromford Associates LLC and Tamboer Consulting LLC 

To All of Our Clients: Thank You


Today I want to take a moment to express some gratitude on behalf of my entire team. We want to thank each and every one of you for your support.

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Happy Thanksgiving! Today I want to take a moment to express some gratitude on behalf of my entire team. We want to thank each and every one of you for your support. We appreciate you giving us the opportunity to go to bat for you.

Being able to demonstrate our experience, skill, dedication, and knowledge by helping you buy or sell property is something we are very grateful for.

With that said, I want to bring your attention to a magazine put out internationally by Keller Williams: OutFront. Recently, I was fortunate enough to be featured in the magazine, and I just want to share this experience with you.

At first, I hesitated to share this news because I don’t want to seem egotistical, but I ultimately decided that I should, since it is thanks to all of you that I’ve been able to achieve this honor. Since you helped make it happen, my team and I would love to ship you a copy of this issue out so that you can see it for yourselves.

The article mostly covers my real estate story. For those of you who don’t know, I entered the world of real estate in 2005 with $40 I borrowed from my sister. There was no YouTube or Zillow back then. It was all about advertising in the newspaper.
I entered the world of real estate in 2005 with $40 I borrowed from my sister.
Using the $40 I borrowed from my sister, I was able to put an ad in the Saturday newspaper saying: “For a free list of rentals in North Scottsdale, call Kelly.”

I thought that if I could help people find rental properties, I might be able to help those same people buy homes in the future once they were done with their lease. And that’s how it all began.

Just over 12 and a half years later, here I am. So, again, I just want to thank all of you who have supported my team and I over the years.

If you have any other questions or would like more information, feel to give me a call or send me an email. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

9 Things You Shouldn’t Forget to Consider When Buying a Home


There are nine considerations you shouldn’t overlook when buying your home. Being mindful of them will prevent you from possibly making a big mistake.

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When purchasing a home, there are nine things you need to consider that the vast majority of other homebuyers don’t:

1. The neighborhood at night. Neighborhood’s change at night—it’s a fact. At least, most of them do. Drive through your prospective home’s neighborhood at night and around the home itself to see if there are any college students or dogs barking nonstop or things of that nature.

2. The daily commute. Even though Google Maps may say it takes a certain amount of time to go from point A to point B, drive that route yourself during the busiest time of day to make sure you’re not stuck in a commute that’s longer than what you bargained for.

3. The CC&Rs (covenants, conditions, and restrictions). Just because a neighborhood doesn’t have an HOA doesn’t mean they don’t have CC&Rs. I’d argue that if you have an HOA and valid CC&Rs, that’s the best of both worlds because there’s a standard of living for the people who live there and they’re not governed by an HOA.

4. Whether the home can be rented out or not. Some HOA neighborhoods don’t allow certain properties to be leased out, especially on a short-term rental basis.
These nine considerations will ensure you buy the right home for you.
5. The bedroom-to-bathroom ratio. If you buy a single-story home, always buy a property with at least two or 1.75 bathrooms. Buyers in the future will want that. If it’s a two-story home, I recommend that you have a powder room or a half-bathroom on the main level. That’s another thing future buyers will look for.

6. The need for specialty inspections. Home inspections are a must. However, if they red-flag something or tell you that you should look at something a little bit closer with a qualified inspector, we highly recommend you do that.

7. Features that cannot be changed. The two most important features that cannot be changed are location and lot. It’s very important to base the foundation of what you’re looking to buy off of these two factors.

8. The resale value. If your home backs up to a busy street, just because that doesn’t bother you doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consider whether it will bother a large part of the buyer pool when you sell the home in the future. Know what kind of adjustments or discounts you need to make when it comes to factors like that so you buy the home correctly and at market value.

9. Whether there is room to grow. When it comes to this, you want to know your lot setbacks, the zoning of your lot, and if you have load-bearing walls. If you want to knock down a wall to open a room up, you’ll want to check with a specialty engineer if that wall is load-bearing. If so, it can still be done, but it might cost a little more.

Our team does our best to check all nine of these boxes when helping our buyers buy homes. If you have any other questions about buying a home, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We’d love to help you.